National Forest Trial (Barton 1999)

A series of species trials were set up to investigate the establishment and early growth (up to 14 years old) of 44 native and non-native tree species on a variety of different site types in lowland Britain. On good quality lowland afforestation sites, Platanus x hispanica (London plane) established and grew more successfully than the native trees tested, and may be an example of a species that could theoretically be established in anticipation of future climate change. Experiments on a variety of community woodland sites indicated that a range of exotic species, such as X Cupressocyparis leylandii (Leyland cypress), may have the potential for establishing a woodland cover on poorly restored land where few other trees would grow. However, on less challenging, better restored sites, a wide range of native species also grew successfully. Further long-term and larger scale trials on a wider variety of sites are required to confirm the potential of the species tested for British conditions. The results from these experiments also showed that relative growth rates of different species can vary through time, highlighting the danger in making premature judgements about species suitability based solely on very early tree growth. See also: Willoughby, I., Stokes, V., Poole, J., White, J.E.J. and Hodge, S.J. (2007) The potential of 44 native and non-native species for woodland creation on a range of contrasting sites in lowland Britain. Forestry, 80 (5): 531-553. Attribution statement: If you use this data you must cite Willoughby, I., Stokes, V., Poole, J., White, J.E.J. and Hodge, S.J. (2007) The potential of 44 native and non-native species for woodland creation on a range of contrasting sites in lowland Britain. Forestry, 80 (5): 531-553.

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Last Updated January 18, 2024, 13:13 (UTC)
Created May 20, 2016, 11:28 (UTC)